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Photos: Saving the golden-winged warbler

Environment Ann Arbor Miller · ·

1 Dr. Henry Streby, left, holds a male golden-winged Warbler on June 9, 2011, on the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn. Streby and other researchers -- including Dr. John Loegering at right -- are studying the songbird's habitat and breeding preferences in northern Minnesota. 
2 Golden-winged Warblers like this male, which was photographed on June 9, 2011, on the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn., typically weigh 9 grams and are roughly twice the size of a hummingbird. 
3 A field journal details information about each of the 38 female golden-winged Warblers wearing radio transmitters in a study area on the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn. In addition to a transmitter, each bird sports a unique combination of tiny color bands to help researchers identify the birds from a distance. 
4 Dr. Henry Streby works to replace a radio transmitter on a female golden-winged Warbler on June 9, 2011, at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn. The transmitters, which cost $150 each, are helping researchers study the songbird's habitat and breeding preferences. 
5 This golden-winged Warbler nest with its four eggs is typical for the small songbird, which builds a cup nest on the ground or low in a bush. 
6 Golden-winged Warblers are most active in the early morning hours. Researchers who are studying the songbird's habitat and breeding preferences on the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn., often begin their day at first light. 
7 Researchers Justin Lehman, left, and Dr. Henry Streby place a radio transmitter on a female golden-winged Warbler on June 9, 2011, at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn. 
8 Researcher Justin Lehman lifts an antenna as part of his efforts to identify the location of female golden-winged Warblers on June 9, 2011, at the Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge near White Earth, Minn. 
9 The breeding grounds for the majority of the world's golden-winged Warblers are found in northern Minnesota, southern Manitoba and portions of Wisconsin. The small songbird begins its migration in early fall to winter in southern Central America and northern South America.