Photos: Farmers scramble to buy feed for cattle

Business ·

1 A cow eats its feed at Durst Brothers Dairy farm in Mantorville Thursday, May 30, 2013. The farm grows its own feed for its 3,000 heads of livestock. However, the farm has replanted its alfalfa crop after losing about 900 acres to the weather. To compound matters, the delayed spring and soggy weather has prevented the farm from planting the remainder of its crop. 
2 A cow enters the milking parlor at Durst Brothers Dairy farm in Mantorville Thursday, May 30, 2013. The farm grows its own feed for its 3,000 heads of livestock. However, the farm has replanted its alfalfa crop after losing about 900 acres to the weather. 
3 Alfalfa sprouts in a field at the Durst Brothers Dairy farm Thursday, May 30, 2013, in Mantorville. The farm grows its own feed for its 3,000 heads of livestock. However, the farm has had to replant its alfalfa crop after losing about 900 acres of it due to the weather. In addition, the delayed spring and soggy weather has prevented the farm from planting the remainder of its crop. 
4 Cows eat their feed at Durst Brothers Dairy farm in Mantorville Thursday, May 30, 2013. The farm, a large operation with about 3,000 head of livestock, lost acres of alfalfa used to feed its animals thanks to the delayed spring this year. In addition, the abundant amount of rain in Southeastern Minnesota has kept the farm from planting the crops it needs to recover. 
5 Juan Angulo, left, cleans the udders of cows before the milking process begins at the Durst Brothers Dairy farm Thursday, May 30, 2013, in Mantorville, Minn. The farm, a large operation with about 3,000 head of livestock, lost acres of alfalfa used to feed its animals to the delayed spring this year. In addition, the abundant amount of rain in Southeastern Minnesota has kept the farm from planting the crops it needs to recover. 
6 Machines milk cows at the Durst Brothers Dairy farm Thursday, May 30, 2013, in Mantorville, Minn. The farm grows its own feed for its 3,000 heads of livestock. However, because of the delayed spring and soggy weather in Southeastern Minnesota, the farm has had to replant its alfalfa crop after it lost about 900 acres of the high-protein plant. 
7 Ron Durst, partner and operations manager of Durst Brothers Dairy, says the alfalfa shortage local farmers are seeing is unprecedented. He believes his farm could lose about half a million dollars because of the shortage of alfalfa and the late corn planting he will have to do because of the delayed spring and soggy weather Southeastern Minnesota has endured. 
8 Alfalfa sprouts in a field at the Durst Brothers Dairy farm Thursday, May 30, 2013, in Mantorville, Minn. The farm grows its own feed for its 3,000 heads of livestock. However, the farm has had to replant its alfalfa crop after losing about 900 acres of it due to the weather. To compound matters, the delayed spring and soggy weather has prevented the farm from planting the remainder of its crop.