Photos: The legacy of the 'Root Beer Lady'

Environment ·

1 The point cabin near Knife Lake was one of the cabins at the Isle of Pines resort that Dorothy Molter operated and used until the time of her death in 1986. It was taken apart piece by piece and reconstructed at the site of the Dorothy Molter Museum in Ely, Minn. 
2 A picture of Dorothy Molter hangs in the Dorothy Molter Museum in Ely, Minn. 
3 From left: Dorothy Molter Museum curator Mary Parks, executive director Sarah Guy-Levar and board member Sherry Abts stand in front of Molter's winter cabin. 
4 After Dorothy Molter died, her cabins were taken apart piece by piece and brought back to Ely, Minn. where they were reassembled on the grounds of what is now the Dorothy Molter Museum. During the deconstruction, each log was labeled with a marker so the volunteers reconstructing the cabins would know where each piece went. 
5 When the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness allowed motorized access, bottled soda was regularly hauled into the Isle of Pines resort that Dorothy Molter owned and operated. After the ban was put in place, it became impractical and extremely difficult to haul in large quantities of soda bottles, but Dorothy Molter still had thousands of bottles onsite. Instead of disposing of the soda bottles, she started brewing her own root beer and used them to bottle and store the root beer. 
6 Dorothy Molter brewed her own brand of root beer from scratch using ingredients like those pictured here. 
7 The Dorothy Molter Museum brews its own root beer to raise funds for the museum's operation. 
8 Peggy Rosett was one of Dorothy's Angels. She and others earned that nickname because they regularly hauled supplies to Dorothy when she needed it. 
9 Dorothy Molter collected broken paddles and used them in the construction of a fence near her cabins. Over time, people would paint pictures and write messages on them that reflected where they came from. Many of the original paddles from Molter's fence are now on display at the museum. 
10 Dorothy Molter Museum tour guides JoAnn Bird, left, and Edye Ruoho talk about Dorothy Molter's life during the winter in a remote cabin in the BWCAW. 
11 Tour guide JoAnn Bird talks about Dorothy Molter's two cabins at the museum. This is the point cabin, one of the cabins at the Isle of Pines resort that Molter operated and used until the time of her death in 1986. 
12 A wood-carved version of the Dorothy Molter Museum logo resides on the outside of the museum's gift shop.