Photos: White Bear Lake transforms into interactive arts experience


Admirers wander past the Ice Garden.
1 Admirers wander past the Ice Garden in process by artists Peter Schulze and Lisa Carlson (not pictured). Schulze and Carlson "glue" frozen shapes together with water in freezing temperatures, documenting the sculpture's progress with time-lapse photography. For color, they used beet juice to dye some of the ice forms. 
Seth and Owen Iverson take in the mythical shapes on the dome above them.
2 Seth Iverson, of Minneapolis, and his son Owen, 15 months, take in the mythical shapes on the dome above them in the Artetarium Shanty on Saturday, Feb. 4. Artists Gabriel Bodkin and Alex Schluender created the space for visitors to reflect on the archetypes and myths that make up their understanding of the human story. 
Transportation includes pedicab rides inside giant animals.
3 Pedicab rides inside giant animals -- in this case, a seal -- over frozen water are just part the offerings of the project. 
Maia Peterson wraps yarn around a frame in the String Box Shanty.
4 Maia Peterson, of Forest Lake, wraps yarn around a frame in the String Box Shanty at the Art Shanty Projects on frozen White Bear Lake Saturday. Six artists collaborated on the piece, which showcases the effect of the human touch over time. Every weekend, the frames will be threaded with string by visitors, so it evolves during the duration of the event. 
The project transforms White Bear Lake into a creative community space.
5 The Art Shanty Projects on frozen White Bear Lake transforms a solid lake into a creative community space. 
Marc Flodquist and Rebecca Barclay manipulate overlapping screens.
6 Marc Flodquist, left, and Rebecca Barclay, of Minneapolis, peer through and manipulate the moire effect created by overlapping screens in the new Snow Blind Shanty. The Snow Blind was created by artist Robin Garwood to offer a visually-distorting experience. 
Ruggles, an Old English Sheepdog puppy, had his own transportation.
7 Though not a part of the official event, Ruggles, an Old English Sheepdog puppy, drew his share of attention as owners Robin Schwartzman (a 2010 Shanty artist), right, and Tom Loftus, second from left, pulled him around on Saturday. 
The red panels of the Winter Parasol Shanty collect solar energy.
8 Visitors wrapping yarn around the String Box Shanty are framed by the red panels of the Winter Parasol Shanty created by artist Kerrik Wessel. The panels are beautiful but also serve collect solar energy to generate electricity. 
Marge Pekula of Chisago City kept her hula hoop going.
9 Marge Pekula of Chisago City kept her hula hoop rotating for an extended period of time outside the Summer Party Shanty. As children looked on in awe, she laughed and said it kept her warm. 
A visitor leaves 'The Sky is Falling' shanty.
10 A visitor leaves "The Sky is Falling" shanty, which gives guests light and sound biofeedback. 
Jim Henley's artwork was nearly finished.
11 Jim Henley's artwork was nearly finished at the end of the first day of the Art Shanty Projects on Saturday. Henley belongs to the group Outdoor Painters of Minnesota. He went to the Shanty Village to paint "en plein air" and visit with guests about the challenges of outdoor winter painting. 
Artist Jeremy Bue, right, guides visitors in making potato print art.
12 Artist Jeremy Bue, right, guides visitors in making potato print art in the Chef Shanty. Throughout the event, Bue will offer various activities combining art and food. 
A visitor peers into the Leaf Your Fears Behind Shanty.
13 A visitor peers into the Leaf Your Fears Behind Shanty. In it, artist Giuliana Pinto, not pictured, asks people to reflect on their fears and comforts, writing comments on paper leaves which are hung on the tree. As the installation grows with participation, the structure will blossom, reminding others that they are not alone. 
Annika Leafblad, 9, exits the Birdhouse of Arthur J. E. Wren.
14 Maren Leafblad, right, of Arden Hills and her daughter Annika Leafblad, 9, exit the Birdhouse of Arthur J. E. Wren with their family. Artist Simon Sutherland created the space as an invitation to explore and to spend a moment of enjoyment in it alone and with others. 
Terry Egge, right, receives a bear hug from Tami Bear.
15 Terry Egge, right, receives a bear hug from Tami Bear (aka Tami Traeger) on Saturday. 
The interactive event is free and open Saturdays and Sundays through Feb.
16 The Art Shanty Projects on White Bear Lake brings to the frozen space an event the organizers call "part art gallery, part art residency and part social experiment."