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MPR News

The state of U.S. voter ID laws

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Judith Ritchart votes
Judith Ritchart votes on August 12, 2014 at Macalester Plymouth United Church for the Minnesota primary election.
Will Matsuda / MPR News

Last week, the Supreme Court allowed the Texas voter ID law to stand. 

From The New York Times:

The Supreme Court's action set the ground rules in Texas for the current election. Early voting there starts Monday, which helps explain the court's rush to issue the order as soon as Justice Ginsburg had finished her dissent.

The law, enacted in 2011, requires voters seeking to cast their ballots at the polls to present photo identification like a Texas driver's or gun license, a military ID or a passport.

The University of Delaware's Center for Political Communication released a study this month that said support of voter ID laws can be very easily racialized, influencing Americans' positive or negative feelings about ID requirements. 

On The Daily Circuit, we look at what the ruling means for voters and how other states are handling similar laws.