Reactions from around Minnesota about Osama bin Laden's death

Osama bin Laden, the mastermind of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, has been killed by U.S. forces in Pakistan. Minnesota Public Radio News has reached out to our Public Insight Network for thoughts and reactions of the news.

SOME RESPONSES SO FAR:

"I was at home and saw a tweet that rumored bin Laden was dead and suggested President Obama was going to tell the nation. A flood of emotions washed over me. Relief, joy, concern for the military currently there, worry about extremist reactions and a huge cheer for the team that got him. I flashed to the moment I heard about 9/11 and subsequently who the mastermind was and also to my youngest child. I was pregnant with her on 9/11/01 and we've been hunting bin Laden her entire life. What am I going to say to her in when she wakes? My husband is a pilot and is in the air tonight flying a commercial flight to Paris. Did ops send him a message or will he find out when he lands? Will he be treated differently in Europe the next few days? Will he be safe flying home?"

- Mary Aelich, Kenosha, Wis.

"While it is a good emotional booster, it is not the end of terrorism or threats to the U.S. and its people. We will always need a military to deal with outside threats like [Osama] bin Laden and his followers. This is just one step in a continuing process of protecting outselves from others who wish to do us harm. The war against terrorism is far from over. There will be more bin Ladens that will rise up in and after our lifetime."

- Cari Lucas, Nisswa, Minn. Lucas is a former National Guard soldier and a Republican.

"I'm very proud that our government didn't just 'rush' into getting bin Laden even though we knew where he was for months. Patience in situations like this are a key component to getting the mission done properly."

-Lisa Kruse-Robles, Forest Lake, Minn. Kruse-Robles is a wife of a currently deployed National Guard soldier.

"I cannot claim to have a good understanding of our military. I don't have the big picture and rely on only what I hear, read, and how I feel about it. I can say with complete confidence that I feel safe. That is the ultimate goal of a country's military. Make the people feel safe. I may have disagreements with policy, or agitations with budget constraints. But each day when I wake up and prepare my kids for the day I don't fear being killed in a crossfire with insurgents, I don't assume a terrorist attack is going to destroy everything I love. I am aware of the possibility, but I feel safe despite. This is due to our US military who stands up and fights for my right to feel this way."

- Rayna Condra, St. Paul, Minn.

"I have always respected our military and this reinforces my confidence in these courageous people who are committed to defend us. I may not always agree with government policies but this is my country and I am grateful to be a citizen of the United States of America."

-Charles Nelson, Albertville, Minn.

"I'm not quick to petty patriotism, but this made me feel a sense of pride in my country. After 9 years and 4,000 of our boys lost, it finally made me feel that their lives weren't lost in vain."

-Joseph DiMarius, Manktao, Minn.

"I cannot claim to have a good understanding of our military. I don't have the big picture and rely on only what I hear, read, and how I feel about it. I can say with complete confidence that I feel safe. That is the ultimate goal of a country's military. Make the people feel safe. I may have disagreements with policy, or agitations with budget constraints. But each day when I wake up and prepare my kids for the day I don't fear being killed in a crossfire with insurgents, I don't assume a terrorist attack is going to destroy everything I love. I am aware of the possibility, but I feel safe despite. This is due to our US military who stands up and fights for my right to feel this way."

- Rayna Condra, St. Paul, Minn.

"It saddens me that the U.S., known to be a leader in innovation, has not yet figured out new ways to respond to violence. We paved the way for democracy to become the gold standard in governing. When will we lead the world in justice enforced by peaceful responses rather than violent retaliation. It's likely our violent response will lead to more violence. Of course what Osama bin Laden led others to do is reprehensible. Dealing with evil is obviously a conundrum. We spend billions of dollars designing weapons and strategies to kill. What would happen if we spent billions on developing nonviolent responses?"

-Jane Reilly, Roseville, Minn.

"I'm a 60 percent disabled veteran - I've long supported the efforts of our military and our government. It saddens me that this event, however, is blowing up into anything more than a symbolic victory. Our soldiers will continue to face hostile forces. I'm still concerned that we're trying to force social and cultural change with military solutions. If we really want to make change in the minds of our enemies we should be building schools, hospitals and partnerships."

-A.J. Moses, Oakdale, Minn.

"I'm not sure if it means anything to me to be completely honest. I know I feel shocked. But I certainly don't have any sense of closure. The man who bankrolled al-Qaeda for two decades and helped orchestrate the most horrific attack on American soil has been killed, yet all I can do is sit here and wonder if I really even care anymore. And that's disconcerting to me. I'm not trying to be insensitive but I've talked about this with several of my friends and they understood where I was coming from. I guess don't feel anything, I just feel empty. And that says something."

-Raghav Mehta, Minneapolis

"It really means pack up time, as the mission — the one which sent them there — is basically over and done. As far as military policy is concerned, there will be a significant amount of reduction in military allocation. I would think that the public would want to know about this "sixth branch of service" called the Joint Special Operations Command (or JSOC). I had the pleasure of working alongside elements of that "service" and they are indeed the "best of the best of the best" and can draw from every other branch, every portion of the American military to complete their missions."

-Mike Walton is a retired Army Public Affairs Officer who served in Iraq and is now living in Excelsior, Minn.

"I wish we hadn't had to kill him. I feel like it is a kind of failure. I know he has done terrible things, but I have a terrible time believing killing makes it okay. I wish we were not so violent. I know it is complicated, and I don't blame the military or anyone else.

After 9/11 I would sneer everytime I saw his picture. Within a day or two that bothered me, so I cut out his picture, laminated it it, and carried it in my pocket so I could hold it in my had when we prayed the Our Father and would remember to pray for him when I felt it in my pocket. One day it disappreared and I knew my little drama was unnecessary. From then on I prayed for him off and on.

I support our military, but sometimes I think the less I know about what they have to do, the better off I am. They are always in my prayers. After all, I grew up knowing I was born one month after Pearl Harbor. We were taught to pray "for our servicemen and country." Now I add service women."

-Stefanie Weisgram works at St. John's University in Collegeville

"It's just great. I think it's a huge win for America. It's a great day to be an American. I'm really happy for Obama. I'm really happy for Obama."

-Michelle Wood Shoreview, Minn.

INTERNATIONAL RESPONSES:

"All of the people are stupefied by the news, but most brazilians are making jokes about it. Brazilians don't trust the US government much, because the US helped the brazilian military in the 1964 coup d'etat. So, our first reaction is to create or believe in conspiracy theories."

-Marcelo Trasel is a professor in Porto Alegre, Brasil

"As an American, I'm glad that this symbol is no longer around. Whether there's any practical implication to that, I don't pretend to know. My Chinese colleagues really didn't have a reaction although the news is widely available via Hong Kong media. They don't see that this has much impact on them. Did have dinner with a Brit this evening who pointed out that the three ongoing wars are going to remain ongoing. Our discussion was brief. We went back to talking about the royal wedding. No other foreigners have mentioned it to me other than the 'Hey, did you hear ... ? '"

-Mark Giorgini is an ex-pat American in Shenzhen, China

"Big relief, at least some positive news. Living in INDIA,was always suspicious of Pakistan's role in the war against terrorism. Today's disclosure that he was living in a mansion near Islamabad and close to a very prominent military base only cements our doubts."

-Poota Muneja lives in Delhi, India

"I am frightened of reprisals. I am American living in London and am the Pastor of a St. Anne's Lutheran Church near St Paul's Cathedral. I have a family: a wife and two small girls. My eight year old daughter asked me if we should have a party that he died. As a Christian I do not believe that we should celebrate the death of any one person. I am concerned that Americans are celebrating in the streets the death of a person. While I understand the feeling, I do not think it is an appropriate response from Americans. We value life, justice, and do not call for the death of anyone."

-Timothy Dearhamer is an American living in London

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