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Don't read these: The most frequently challenged books of 2015

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The most frequently challenged books of 2015
Many of the most frequently challenged books of 2015 contain issues of sexuality or gender identity.
Courtesy of publishers

Every week, The Thread tackles your book questions, big and small. Ask a question now.

This week's question: What were the most frequently challenged books of 2015?

Every year, the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom tallies reports of attempts to ban books from schools and libraries. Last week, they released the list of the top 10 most challenged books of 2015.

1) "Looking for Alaska" by John Green

Reasons challenged: Offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.

As the author of the bestselling "Fault in Our Stars" and "Paper Towns" — both of which have been adapted into films — Green is a young adult lit phenomenon. "Looking for Alaska," which will also be adapted into a film next year, tells the story of a boy who enrolls at a boarding school, and encounters a force-of-nature girl who lives down the hall.

2) "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James

Reasons challenged: Sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and other ("poorly written," "concerns that a group of teenagers will want to try it").

James's erotic romance novel follows the steamy relationship between recent college grad Anastasia Steele and a wealthy and controlling young business man, Christian Grey.

3) "I Am Jazz" by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings

Reasons challenged: Inaccurate, homosexuality, sex education, religious viewpoint, and unsuited for age group.

This illustrated children's book is based on the true story of Jazz Jennings, a transgender child who helped pen the story.

4) "Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out" by Susan Kuklin

Reasons challenged: Anti-family, offensive language, homosexuality, sex education, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other ("wants to remove from collection to ward off complaints").

Kuklin interviewed six transgender young adults about their experiences establishing their identities. Their stories are collected here, in their own words, and accompanied by photographs from Kuklin.

5) "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" by Mark Haddon

Reasons challenged: Offensive language, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group, and other ("profanity and atheism").

Haddon's critically acclaimed novel is narrated by Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old autistic boy falsely accused of killing a neighborhood dog. 

6) "The Holy Bible"

Reasons challenged: Religious viewpoint.

This marked the first year the religious text has landed on the ALA's list.

7) "Fun Home" by Alison Bechdel

Reasons challenged: Violence and other ("graphic images").

Bechdel's graphic novel autobiography tells the story of Bechdel coming to terms with her sexuality, coming out as a lesbian and finding out that her father was gay.

8) "Habibi" by Craig Thompson

Reasons challenged: Nudity, sexually explicit, and unsuited for age group.

Thompson's graphic novel presents an epic tale, set in the Middle East, of two child slaves fighting to find their place in the world. 

9) "Nasreen's Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan" by Jeanette Winter

Reasons challenged: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group, and violence.

This children's book tells the true story of a girl in Afghanistan whose grandmother risks everything to send her to school, despite being forbidden by the Taliban.

10) "Two Boys Kissing" by David Levithan

Reasons challenged: Homosexuality and other ("condones public displays of affection").

Levithan's young adult novel is based on the real-life story of two 17-year-old boys who attempt to set a Guinness World Record with a 32-hour marathon kissing session.