Thousands of runners compete in Twin Cities Marathon

Kenyan Dominic Ondoro wins his third consecutive Twins Cities Marathon.
Kenyan Dominic Ondoro approaches the finish line at Twins Cities Marathon, Sunday in St. Paul. Ondoro won the marathon for the third consecutive time.
Jerry Holt | Star Tribune via AP

The rain didn't stop thousands of runners from competing in the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Sunday.

Two Kenyans won the marathon. In the men's division, the unofficial winner was Dominic Ondoro, 29. He won for the third straight year, completing the 26-point-two mile marathon in 2:11.53.

"To win this race three times, I'm very happy. And next year, I will come back," said Ondoro at the finish line. "I didn't break the record that I set last year, but I'm happy to win."

Jane Kibii wins the women's division of the Twins Cities Marathon.
Jane Kibii wins the women's division of the Twins Cities Marathon, Sunday in St. Paul.
Jerry Holt | Star Tribune via AP

In the women's division, Jane Kibii, 32, was a repeat winner, coming in at 2:30.25. She said the course, which ends on a downhill slope, wasn't easy.

"I don't like running downhill, and I was scared about that, because they can go faster," said Kibii. "And I was like if I can stay with them until like 20 miles, 22, I will take advantage of that."

Matthew Porterfield wins the Wheeler Division of the Twin Cities Marathon.
Matthew Porterfield of Knoxville, Tenn., was the unofficial winner in the Wheeler Division of the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon.
Doualy Xaykaothao | MPR News

Matthew Porterfield, 36, of Knoxville, TN, was the unofficial winner in the Wheeler Division, with a time of 2:04:03, according to the marathon website.

"A lot of the guys took off fast, but I just stayed back," said Porterfield. "And then I saw an opening. He was getting tired, so I took off to the right, and just kept going, and I looked back, and he slowed down. It was a mind game, so it was fun."

Winners went home with at least $10,000 in prize money.

Runners faced wet, cold conditions at the start of the race in Minneapolis, but the race ended for the winners with cloudy skies in St. Paul. The course starts near U.S. Bank Stadium, passes city lakes, follows Minnehaha Creek and the Mississippi River and ends at the State Capitol.

Ben Osborn ran the marathon to raise money for kids with brain tumors.
Ben Osborn, known as TotallyBrainDad, ran the marathon wearing a giant pink brain that weighs over 7 lbs. on his head. He's fund-raising for kids who have brain tumors.
Doualy Xaykaothao | MPR News

Ben Osborn ran the marathon wearing a giant pink brain that weighs over 7 lbs. on his head. He's fund-raising for kids who have brain tumors.

"I was running in their honor, and my son's honor," Osborn said. "What I did is nothing. It's fun, and goofy, but it's just to raise money for them, honor them, and their families."

Among the people running the 10-mile race were Paul Idusogie of Woodbury and Brian Singer of St Paul. They didn't know each other early Sunday, but by the time they crossed the finish line, the two walked away as friends.

Brian Singer and Paul Idusogie ran the 10 mile race together.
Brian Singer of St Paul and Paul Idusogie of Woodbury met as strangers the morning of the Twin Cities Marathon on Oct. 1, 2017. They leave together as friends.
Doualy Xaykaothao | MPR News

"We met on the train, and then we ran for a while. And then all of a sudden I see him, and I'm like, 'Hey Paul, we're going to run together now," said Singer. "I learned all about Paul. He's a former engineer. He's a pastor now."

"And Brian is a business owner, he has businesses all over the world," said Idusogie.

About 7,500 runners competed in the 36th annual marathon, while another 10,000 people ran the 10-mile race.

"Each mile you're ticking, you're making an accomplishment," said Bailey Plath, 21, who ran the 10-mile. "I really like the thrill of passing the finish line, just knowing that you work so hard for this, for months. It just keeps me physically, and mentally healthy."

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