Finally, artist gets to see her sculpture's Minnesota perch

Katharina Fritsch  was pleased to see the sculpture sporting a snow beard
Artist Katharina Fritsch says the sculpture was designed for all the different kinds of Minnesota weather, and she enjoys seeing how the sculpture changes with the conditions.
Euan Kerr | MPR News

German artist Katharina Fritsch finally got to see her gigantic blue rooster in place at the Walker Art Center Friday.

It's been in position for a number of months now, and is on its way to becoming an icon of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden.

The reunion between Fritsch and the piece officially known as "Hahn/Cock" lasted only a matter of minutes. The snow was blowing horizontally across the Sculpture Garden when Fritsch and other Walker staff, including Executive Director Olga Viso, trooped down to the massive blue bird.

A few minutes later, in Viso's office with a warming cup of tea in front of her, Fritsch said she liked what she could see, and in particular how the snow caked on parts of the sculpture.

'Hahn/Cock' was a little indistinct during the first snowfall.
Even painted bright blue, "Hahn/Cock"was a little indistinct during the first snowfall of the season as its creator Katharina Fritsch came to see it in place for the first time on Friday.
Euan Kerr | MPR News

"It has to deal with the weather," she said. "And I like his breast, that he got a little white beard. I like the way the weather plays with the sculptures."

Not only does an artist need to take the weather into account when designing a piece for outdoor display; there is also a different audience from inside a museum or gallery. And there is the question of how a sculpture will age, and whether it will remain relevant as the years pass.

"But I have the feeling it will be good here," she said.

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