Counter Stories: Sisters in Loss

Black, Native American, Hmong and Latino women share their experiences of coping with the loss of their child during pregnancy in a new book, “What God is Honored Here.”

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"What God is Honored Here?" brings together writings on miscarriage and infant loss by Native women and women of color.
University of Minnesota Press

Black, Native American, Hmong and Latino women share their experiences of coping with the loss of their child during pregnancy in a new book, “What God is Honored Here.”

The worst nightmare for any parent is the loss of a child. As a society we are uneasy and reluctant to talk about death and certainly not about the death of a child. The trauma can be devastating as parents quietly cope with their loss. But when fetal loss happens at a significantly higher rate for Black and Native American women, the community looks for answers.

The Counter Stories team looks at the effect of implicit bias and institutional racism on women of color’s reproductive health, and at the greater historical narrative of native women and women of color being continually separated from their children.

Hosts are:

Don Eubanks, associate professor at Metropolitan State University and cultural consultant.

Anthony Galloway, executive director of Arts-Us, Center for the African Diaspora.

Marianne Combs, correspondent for MPR News.

With special guests: Shannon Gibney and Kao Kalia Yang, co-editors of “What Gold is Honored Here? Writings on miscarriage and infant loss by and for Native Women and Women of Color.”