Free your home and the rest will follow

A book cover next to two people standing next to a wall
Joshua Field Millburn (left) and lifelong friend Ryan Nicodemus came to minimalism after they grew disenchanted with mindless accumulation. In addition to their popular documentaries and hit podcast, they now have a book, “Love People, Use Things: Because the Opposite Never Works."
Joshua Weaver

Shocking fact: The average American home has more than 300,000 items in it. And that was before the pandemic, when many of us used Amazon as retail therapy.

While Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus certainly understand the impulse, they encourage a different path. When they were kids growing up in poverty in Ohio, they equated stuff with success. But as they got older and were able to acquire more, they discovered that material goods didn’t grow their happiness.

That’s when The Minimalists was born. Both Millburn and Nicodemus embarked on a journey to get rid of clutter. To their surprise, they found that decluttering their space led to a decluttering of their minds — and that gave them the mental and emotional space to reorder their relationships.

Since that time, they’ve launched a website, a podcast, two Netflix documentaries (“Minimalism” and “Less is Now”) and now a book that details their passion for finding more in less.

Friday, they talked with host Kerri Miller about their written blueprint, “Love People, Use Things” and share lessons learned.

Guests:

To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above.

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