The U.S. urban-rural divide is mostly a myth. Here's what's real.

A special Minnesota Now

Pizza Farm
Students from St. Olaf College sit in a circle as they have pizza on the lawn near the 101-year-old red barn at the Red Barn Farm near Northfield, Minn. Research shows the so-called urban-rural divide is mostly a myth that is hurting the country as a whole.
Jim Mone | AP 2015

America is a land divided between those who dwell in cities — diverse, educated and growing economically — and those who live in the country — white, uneducated and dependent on dying industries.

Or so the narrative goes.

But research shows the so-called urban-rural divide is mostly a myth that is hurting the country as a whole.

Monday, on a special Minnesota Now, MPR News host Kerri Miller and two guests — both of whom have deep roots in rural America — debunked some myths and shed some light on the realities of rural America.

Guests:

  • Lisa Pruitt is professor of law at UC Davis School of Law where she specializes in rural issues. She will be at the Westminster Town Hall Forum on October 25 to host a session called “Mending the Rural-Urban Rift.”

  • Loka Ashwood is a sociologist and an assistant professor at the University of Kentucky, where she focuses on rural communities and their participation in democracy.

For more on Kerri Miller’s series of town halls throughout Minnesota focusing on the rewards and challenges of making a home in rural America, check out Rural Voice.

Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle Podcasts or RSS.

Before you keep reading ...

MPR News is made by Members. Gifts from individuals fuel the programs that you and your neighbors rely on. Donate today to power news, analysis, and community conversations for all.