Same-sex marriage opponents criticized for linking other side to Nazi propaganda

A group pushing to legalize same-sex marriage in Minnesota is criticizing their opponents for linking same-sex marriage to propaganda in Nazi Germany.

The chair of Minnesota for Marriage, which is working to defeat state efforts to legalize same-sex marriage, released information to pastors urging them to speak out against same-sex marriage on April 7th. The information was released on the website, Minnesota Pastors for Marriage, which is a partner organization for Minnesota for Marriage.

In their documents to pastors, the group released talking points suggesting that "there is no gay gene." It went on to criticize gay rights groups and the media for promoting what it says is debunked science.

"Third, there is a definitive problem. Homosexuals claim: "We were born this way; it is in our genes; God made us gay." They cite old "gay gene" studies predominantly conducted by researchers who are homosexuals; studies that have been repudiated by credible research.

Yet these same biased and discredited studies have been widely publicized by the liberal media as true and factual. They essentially practice Joseph Goebel's (sic) Nazi philosophy of propaganda, which is basically this: Tell a lie long enough and loud enough and eventually most mindless Americans will believe it."

Jake Loesch, a spokesman for Minnesotans United for All Families, says he has deep problems with the claims.

"This just clearly shows that the folks at Minnesota for Marriage have no interest in a civil dialogue. They have no interest in an honest conversation about marriage. Making claims that anyone in any way is comparable to Nazi tactics is disgusting. It's appalling and has no place in public square or in public discussion about what marriage is," Loesch said.

The criticism comes as Minnesotans United for All Families is lobbying the Minnesota Legislature to legalize same-sex marriage.

A spokeswoman for Minnesota for Marriage did not respond to messages for comment. In October, Minnesota for Marriage disavowed a pastor's claim linking same-sex marriage to suppression efforts in Nazi Germany.

UPDATE:

Tonight Minnesota for Marriage spokesperson Autumn Leva sent this statement in response:

"This is simply a desperate attempt to distract Minnesotans in order to convince them that children don't really need a mother and a father. This distraction just exposes the fact that they have been saying the people of Minnesota have given them a mandate to legalize gay 'marriage', when all the polls show that they didn't. This is a smokescreen to cover the fact that they said nothing would change if the amendment were defeated when in fact they are trying to force gay 'marriage' on all Minnesotans. And, it's a perfect example of the attacks on religious freedoms that people can expect if gay 'marriage' is legalized in Minnesota.

The reality is that there are many, many people of faith who believe based on teachings from the Bible, the Torah, the Koran, and other religious texts that marriage is between one man and one woman. They have every right to their beliefs, and to preach on their beliefs. This attempt to discredit MN for Marriage is really a looking glass that allows Minnesotans to see that those attempting to force gay 'marriage' on this state do not, in fact, care about people's deeply held beliefs. They are calling into question these pastors' beliefs as evidenced by their calling out specific Scriptures with which they disagree and the fact that the gay 'marriage' bill only protects the religious freedoms of people when they're in the 4 walls of a church building. That's not enough to protect the freedom of Minnesotans to practice their religion."

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