Woman killed in grain elevator fall identified

A memorial outside the Bunge grain elevator
A small memorial was set outside the abandoned Bunge grain elevator after Emily Roland, a University of Minnesota student, died when she fell in the Como neighborhood elevator in Minneapolis, Minn. The elevator was photographed Tuesday, June 9, 2015.
Jeffrey Thompson | MPR News

Updated: 8:00 p.m. | Posted: 4:37 p.m.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner has identified a woman who died after a fall in a Minneapolis grain elevator Saturday.

Emily Roland, 20, of Cottage Grove died from multiple blunt-force injuries. University of Minnesota spokesperson Joe Koktan said Roland was a sophomore enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts.

The Minneapolis Fire Department said Roland was in the abandoned grain Bunge elevator in the Como neighborhood of the city when she fell nearly three stories inside the building.

Paul Williams, president of Project for Pride in Living, a non-profit housing developer that bought the elevator in 2006, said addressing security at the Bunge grain elevator is a top priority, something his organization has always taken seriously.

Before you keep reading ...

MPR News is made by Members. Gifts from individuals fuel the programs that you and your neighbors rely on. Donate today to power news, analysis, and community conversations for all.

The abandoned Bunge grain elevator
The Minneapolis Fire Department said Emily Roland, a University of Minnesota student, died when she fell in the abandoned Bunge grain elevator in the Como neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minn. The elevator was photographed Tuesday, June 9, 2015.
Jeffrey Thompson | MPR News

"We've welded some of those doors and windows shut. We've had different coverings over. We've had a fence that's been up that continually gets pulled down or gets cut. We have our own security that four to five times a week actually checks in," he said. "It's an ongoing challenge, and we've been really diligent about it."

In 2006, before Project for Pride in Living bought the elevator, another person died at the site from a similar fall.

Williams said the nonprofit would consider demolishing the grain elevator.

Minneapolis Fire Deputy Chief Todd White said while the structure is standing empty, it will be difficult to keep people out.

"No matter what the owner does, or whoever has it, outside of 24 hour security, they're a curious object to children, young adults, transients," White said. "They get inside and don't realize the dangers and perils."