Mpls police ID officer involved in collision that killed motorcyclist

A week after a police-involved shooting and squad car accident left two men dead, Minneapolis police identify the officer involved in the collision with motorcyclist.

Police also announced the department will interview the two wounded officers next week.

Minneapolis police identified the driver of a patrol car that collided with a motorcycle while on the way to the scene, killing 24-year-old Ivan Romero. Officer Joshua Young was responding to a supervisor's request for more squad cars.

The interviews of the two officers would come more than a week after the shooting death of Terrance Franklin, 22. Police say Franklin hid in an Uptown home last Friday and when confronted by police, tried to grab an officer's gun.

The officers, Michael Meath and Ricardo Muro, were wounded and treated at Hennepin County Medical Center. Minneapolis Chief of Police Janee Harteau said earlier this week that they were on pain medication and needed to be "in sound mind" before they give statements.

Franklin's family and friends have complained about a lack of information about the circumstances leading to his death. The police statement released today reiterated that Harteau has offered to meet with Franklin and Romero's families but they have declined.

Earlier this week, Harteau held a news conference that gave a few details about the collision with Romero's motorcycle. She said the police car was traveling between 16 and 17 miles and hour and, when Young went through a red light, traffic had stopped in both directions. Romero's motorcycle struck the rear of the squad car.

Police say tests on DNA and ballistics evidence from the scene may take four to six weeks.

The Minneapolis Police Department is doing the ballistics tests. The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is performing DNA tests. The police department says all DNA testing of its cases are performed by the BCA.

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