Appetites: Tap water can make or break a taste

Water drop falls from a tap
A drop of water falls from a tap in this file photo. The water coming out of the faucet can taste different between faucets just miles apart, and can change the flavor and color of your food.
Thomas Trutschel | Photothek via Getty Images

Minnesotans use about 11 gallons of tap water every day around the home for drinking, cooking, washing dishes and other activities, according to the Met Council.

Water from the faucet can taste different between faucets just miles apart, and that affects not just the glass in your hand, but the flavor and color of your food as well.

MPR News host Tom Crann invited two guests with highly developed taste buds to talk more about our relationship with the tap — and do a little taste testing.

Guests

• Dara Grumdahl from Minneapolis St Paul Magazine and author of "Drink This: Wine Made Simple"

• Erik Eastman with Minnesota Ice

Click the audio player above to hear more.

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