Orange you happy it's leaf-peeping season? Where to find fall colors this weekend

Fall color photos taken in St Paul
Early fall colors in St. Paul in 2020. It's still too early to see the most vibrant shades, according to the state Department of Natural Resources. But portions of northwestern Minnesota are between 25 percent and 50 percent peak.
Kathryn Styer Martinez | MPR News 2020

Another weekend, another opportunity to take in the changing fall colors.

It's still too early to see the most vibrant shades, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' Fall Color Finder. Most of the state hasn't yet turned over a new leaf.

But portions of northwestern Minnesota are between 25 percent and 50 percent peak. Pockets of the North Shore have reached that stage as well.

A map of the latest fall colors.
The best places to find fall colors this weekend in Minnesota.
Courtesy of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Check out a few of the DNR's current highlights and suggestions about where to go and what you’ll see:

Old Mill State Park, northwestern Minnesota

The DNR recommends hitting the Agassiz trail, which will take you from the woods to fields. As you hike the trail, you should be able to see the colors change throughout each area.

Savanna Portage State Park, northeastern Minnesota

Get to Savanna Portage State Park, stat! The DNR says the maple trees "may be at their most colorful this week."

Expect to see everything from yellow leaves to orange foliage to bright red leaves.

Bonus: Mushrooms! And beavers!

Recent rain resulted in the growth of new mushrooms in the forest. Meanwhile, the DNR says beavers are "extremely active at Lake Shumway" right now. You can see a beaver lodge and a food pile across from the fishing pier. (A reminder and a plea: Please do not disturb the wildlife, even for an Instagram selfie.)

Flandrau State Park, southwestern Minnesota

Most of the trees are starting to turn yellow. Unfortunately, many are also losing their leaves before they can change colors.

Luckily, there are also a few critters roaming the park to make for more nature-spotting. No beavers but keep your eyes peeled for several turkey families and deer herds moving through the area.

And — a goat herd is busy munching on buckthorn and other invasive species at the park.

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