MIA hires new director

Kaywin Feldman
Kaywin Feldman will become director and president of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in January 2008.
Image courtesy of Minneapolis Institute of Arts

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts has named Kaywin Feldman as its new director and president. She replaces Bill Griswold, who is stepping down to become the director of the Morgan Library and Museum in New York.

For the last eight years, Feldman has directed the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis.

"While Kaywin's academic and museum management background is impressive, we believe her energy, vision, and dynamic leadership skills will measurably assist the MIA as we continue to advance to the next level locally, nationally, and internationally," said Brian Palmer, chairman of the MIA's board and the head of the search committee.

"I am thrilled to have been selected as the next director and president of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts," said Feldman. "My husband and I look forward to joining the vibrant cultural arts community in the Twin Cities, and we are pleased to be a part of a community so well known for its philanthropy and for having so many committed collectors."

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is Tennessee's oldest and largest encyclopedic art museum.

During her eight-year tenure, Feldman oversaw major acquisitions in all areas of the permanent collection and significantly increased works by African-American artists. She's also credited with increasing the museum's membership and attendance.

Feldman also worked at the Fresno Metropolitan Museum of Art, History and Science in California. She started her career volunteering and working at the British Museum in London.

Feldman, 41, will be the first woman to head the MIA in its 100-year history. She will assume her new post on Jan. 1, 2008.

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