Why 40 Black women are joining forces to run for office in Minnesota in 2020

Left: Alberder Gillespie | Right: Laverne McCartney Knighton
Alberder Gillespie (left), is one of four candidates challenging long-time U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum in Minnesota’s 4th Congressional District. Laverne McCartney Knighton (right) is a DFLer running for the Minnesota Senate in District 65, which covers St. Paul.
Courtesy of Alberder Gillespie and Laverne McCartney Knighton

More than 40 Black women are running for office in Minnesota this year. For many of them, it’s their first time.

Some of them say that in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd, they hope to use their collective political power to respond to his cry for his mother minutes before he died.

Through a movement called Black Women Rising, these women are seeking seats in the Minnesota Legislature, county boards, city councils, school boards and even Congress.

MPR News host Angela Davis also checked in with one of the organizers of a march being held this weekend by mothers and other family members who have lost loved ones to police violence.

Guests:

  • Laverne McCartney Knighton is a DFLer running for the Minnesota Senate in District 65, which covers St. Paul.

  • Alberder Gillespie is a Democrat and one of four candidates challenging long-time U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum in Minnesota’s 4th Congressional District.

  • Mel Reeves is one of the organizers of the National Mother’s March.

Use the audio player above to listen to the program.

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