How teachers are answering the call for more civics education

A sign with the words "amplify your voice"
The civil unrest and swirling conspiracy theories that marked the final year of Donald Trump's presidency have sparked an outcry for improved civics education, advocates say.
Kelly Lacy on Pexels file

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once said that “the only title in our democracy superior to that of ‘president’ is the title of ‘citizen.’”

But with a decadeslong de-emphasis on social studies and government education in American K-12 schools, do students these days know the power they hold as citizens?

The civil unrest and swirling conspiracy theories that marked the final year of Donald Trump's presidency have sparked a bipartisan outcry for more holistic civics education, advocates say. And in our own state, civics education standards are being revised. Meanwhile, social studies teachers are addressing controversial headlines and fostering difficult conversations with their students as many kids learn from home.

A local educator and two advocates joined host Angela Davis to talk about the future of civics education.

Guests:

  • Emma Humphries is the chief education officer for iCivics, a nonpartisan organization that aims to improve kids’ understanding of civics by providing curricula and support to civics educators.

  • Christopher Riano is president of the Center for Civic Education, the nation's largest constitutional law and civic education nonprofit.

Use the audio player above to listen to the program.

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